maths classes
2D Shapes2cosacosb Formula30-60-90 Formulas3D ShapesAbsolute Value FormulaAcute AngleAcute Angle triangleAdditionAlgebra FormulasAlgebra of MatricesAlgebraic EquationsAlgebraic ExpressionsAngle FormulaAnnulusAnova FormulaAnti-derivative FormulaAntiderivative FormulaApplication of DerivativesApplications of IntegrationArc Length FormulaArccot FormulaArctan FormulaArea Formula for QuadrilateralsArea FormulasArea Of A Sector Of A Circle FormulaArea Of An Octagon FormulaArea Of Isosceles TriangleArea Of ShapesArea Under the Curve FormulaArea of RectangleArea of Regular Polygon FormulaArea of TriangleArea of a Circle FormulaArea of a Pentagon FormulaArea of a Square FormulaArea of a Trapezoid FormulaArithmetic Mean FormulaArithmetic ProgressionsArithmetic and Geometric ProgressionAssociative Property FormulaAsymptote FormulaAverage Deviation FormulaAverage Rate of Change FormulaAveragesAxioms Of ProbabilityAxis of Symmetry FormulaBasic Math FormulasBasics Of AlgebraBinary FormulaBinomial Probability FormulaBinomial distributionBodmas RuleBoolean AlgebraBusiness MathematicsCalculusCelsius FormulaCentral Angle of a Circle FormulaCentral Limit Theorem FormulaCentroid of a Trapezoid FormulaChain RuleChain Rule FormulaChange of Base FormulaChi Square FormulaCirclesCircumference FormulaCoefficient of Determination FormulaCoefficient of Variation FormulaCofactor FormulaCompound Interest FormulaConditional Probability FormulaConeConfidence Interval FormulaCongruence of TrianglesCorrelation Coefficient FormulaCos Double Angle FormulaCos Square theta FormulaCos Theta FormulaCosec Cot FormulaCosecant FormulaCosine FormulaCovariance FormulaCubeCylinderDiscover the world of MathsEllipseEquilateral triangleEuler’s formulaHeptagonIntegrationIntegration by partsLinesLocusNatural numbersNumber lineParallelogramPerimeterPolygonPrismProbabilityPyramidSetsSphereSquareStandard deviation formulaSubtractionSymmetryTimeVector

Sphere

Edulyte Maths Lessons

Learn Maths anytime, anywhere

Sign Up

Exploring Spheres: Definition, Properties, and Examples

Comprehensive Definition, Description, Examples & Rules 

Edulyte Maths Lessons

Learn Maths anytime, anywhere

Sign Up
What will you learn

A sphere is a round, three-dimensional object without any edges or vertices. every point on its surface is equal to its centre. The shape has an equal distance between any point on the surface and the centre of the sphere. 

Let’s find out spheres, their definition, properties, and real-world examples in detail

What is a Sphere?

First of all, let’s understand what is a sphere. A sphere is a geometric shape defined by its perfect roundness and smoothness. It can be a 3D version of a circle which means just like a circle it has equal distance from the centre. If R is the centre of the sphere, any point from the R is the same distance irrespective of the point or side. The sphere is an important part of geometry and science. 

Properties of a Sphere

Here are some of the major properties of a sphere: 

Round Shape: One of the main attributes of a sphere is its round shape. The sphere is round and smooth, which makes it an important part of geometry, science, and art. 

Constant Radius: The distance from the centre to any angle is the same, so the radius of the sphere is the same. If you draw lines from the centre or take any point as a centre to draw a line, the radius remains uniform which makes the sphere unique. 

Volume and Surface Area: The sphere has the smallest surface area of the given surfaces. However, on the contrary, it has the largest volume of all the closed shapes or surfaces. Here is the surface of a sphere:

4πr2.

Sphere Volume: The amount of space that a sphere can occupy is defined by its volume. Cubic units are used to measure it. The following is the sphere’s volume formula:

Volume of Sphere, V = (4/3)πr3

where,

V is the volume

r is the radius, and

π(pi) is approx. 3.14 or 22/7.

Surface Area: The surface area of a sphere is the area that is surrounded by its outer surface. Square units are used to measure it. Thus, the following formula can be used to get a sphere’s surface area:

Surface Area of Sphere, S = 4πr2

Surface area of a sphere is given as S = 4π(d/2)2, where d is the diameter. 

Symmetry: Spheres are the epitome of symmetry. No matter how you rotate them, they appear the same from every angle you view. This unique quality makes them a favourite in art and design.

Infinite Axes of Rotation: Unlike many shapes, spheres have an infinite number of axes of rotation. This property makes them incredibly versatile and is often exploited in various applications, from sports to engineering.

Real-World Sphere Examples

Sphere is not limited to textbooks, various real-life objects have the same shape giving life to the sphere concept. The properties of a sphere are rare which can be seen in unique real-life objects such as: 

An air bubble inside a still water can be an example of real-world spheres, with unique characteristics and significance.

Other than that, the sun, Snooker balls, Atoms of a particle, marbles, etc can be some sphere examples.

Sphere Shaped Objects

With permutation and combinations of mathematics, and properties of the sphere, there are many sphere shaped objects that can be found in the world. Some of them are approximately the same while some are remotely close. 

A few of sphere shaped objects examples are: 

  • Planets
  • Basketball 
  • Globe
  • Ping pong ball 
  • Eyes
  • Football

Understanding these deviations adds a layer of complexity to the study of spheres.

Dimensions of a Sphere

You must be aware of spheres’ primary dimensions to completely understand them. The following is a sphere’s essential components of dimensions of a sphere:

Radius: The distance measured in linear segments from the sphere’s centre to any point on its surface. The radius of the sphere is represented by the distance OA if ‘O’ is its centre and A is any point on its surface (for your reference, refer to the graphic below).

Diameter: The diameter of a sphere is the length of a line segment that passes through its centre and connects two points on its surface that are perfectly opposite one another. The diameter’s length is precisely twice that of the radius.

Circumference: The sphere’s circumference is the length of its great circle. The circumference of the dotted circle in the below illustration refers to the sphere’s cross-section that contains its centre.

Volume: A sphere takes up space, just like any other three-dimensional object does. Its volume is the quantity of space that it occupies. 

Surface Area: The sphere’s surface area is the area that its surface occupies. 

Parts of a Sphere

A large circle formed around the diameter is called the surface or outer surface and the space inside is known as a sphere: 

The parts of a sphere are:

  • The internal point that is equally spaced from every point on the sphere is the centre.
  • The radius is the length of the sphere measured from its centre to any given point.
  • The section connecting any two locations on the surface is called a chord.
  • The chord that goes through the centre is known as the diameter.
  • The axis points that are on the surface of the sphere are called the poles.

Together with these components, we can additionally define:

  • Parallels: The circumferences that result from cutting the surface of the sphere with planes perpendicular to the rotational axis.
  • The equator of a sphere is the circumference that remains after its surface is cut using a plane that is perpendicular to its axis of rotation and contains its centre.
  • The meridians are the circumferences that are measured when the sphere’s surface is divided into planes that contain the rotation axis.

Step Up Your Math Game Today!

Free sign-up for a personalised dashboard, learning tools, and unlimited possibilities!

learn maths with edulyte

Key Takeaways

  1. Sphere is a 3D shape similar to Circle. The shape is round and has 3 dimensions.

  2. The Sphere has an equal distance from the centre in all directions. 

  3. The sphere has various properties like being round, equal to centre, 3D, smallest surface area, and largest volume.

  4. Spheres can be seen in various real-life objects that you need to know. Such as Air bubbles, marble, earth, moon, and more.

Quiz

Check your score in the end

Quiz

Check your score in the end
Question of

Question comes here

Frequently Asked Questions

The formula for the surface area of a sphere is A = 4πr².

Yes, some of the real-world examples can include the Earth, basketballs, the Moon, even water droplets, and more that give the same shape as a sphere. These examples of a sphere can be seen anywhere around your everyday life. 

A circle is a two-dimensional shape with all points equidistant from its centre, while a sphere is a three-dimensional shape with the same property, it’s 3D.

Diameter = 2r. Diameter means twice the radius of the sphere.

The key dimensions of a sphere are the radius, diameter, and circumference. The diameter is twice the radius, and the circumference is calculated as C = 2πr.

Like
Share it with your friends

Learn Maths

2D Shapes2cosacosb Formula30-60-90 Formulas3D ShapesAbsolute Value FormulaAcute AngleAcute Angle triangleAdditionAlgebra FormulasAlgebra of MatricesAlgebraic EquationsAlgebraic ExpressionsAngle FormulaAnnulusAnova FormulaAnti-derivative FormulaAntiderivative FormulaApplication of DerivativesApplications of IntegrationArc Length FormulaArccot FormulaArctan FormulaArea Formula for QuadrilateralsArea FormulasArea Of A Sector Of A Circle FormulaArea Of An Octagon FormulaArea Of Isosceles TriangleArea Of ShapesArea Under the Curve FormulaArea of RectangleArea of Regular Polygon FormulaArea of TriangleArea of a Circle FormulaArea of a Pentagon FormulaArea of a Square FormulaArea of a Trapezoid FormulaArithmetic Mean FormulaArithmetic ProgressionsArithmetic and Geometric ProgressionAssociative Property FormulaAsymptote FormulaAverage Deviation FormulaAverage Rate of Change FormulaAveragesAxioms Of ProbabilityAxis of Symmetry FormulaBasic Math FormulasBasics Of AlgebraBinary FormulaBinomial Probability FormulaBinomial distributionBodmas RuleBoolean AlgebraBusiness MathematicsCalculusCelsius FormulaCentral Angle of a Circle FormulaCentral Limit Theorem FormulaCentroid of a Trapezoid FormulaChain RuleChain Rule FormulaChange of Base FormulaChi Square FormulaCirclesCircumference FormulaCoefficient of Determination FormulaCoefficient of Variation FormulaCofactor FormulaCompound Interest FormulaConditional Probability FormulaConeConfidence Interval FormulaCongruence of TrianglesCorrelation Coefficient FormulaCos Double Angle FormulaCos Square theta FormulaCos Theta FormulaCosec Cot FormulaCosecant FormulaCosine FormulaCovariance FormulaCubeCylinderDiscover the world of MathsEllipseEquilateral triangleEuler’s formulaHeptagonIntegrationIntegration by partsLinesLocusNatural numbersNumber lineParallelogramPerimeterPolygonPrismProbabilityPyramidSetsSphereSquareStandard deviation formulaSubtractionSymmetryTimeVector
Newsletters

Sign up for Learner Newsletter

Subscribe now for discounts, learning resources, blogs and guides. We do not spam.

We won’t pass your details on to anyone else. By clicking the subscribe button you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Newsletters

Sign up for Tutor Newsletter

Subscribe now for discounts, learning resources, blogs and guides. We do not spam.

We won’t pass your details on to anyone else. By clicking the subscribe button you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

PTE Tutorials: Customised Packages for Every Learner

Standard

$75 AUD

One time

popular

Premium

$275 AUD

One time

Elite

$575 AUD

One time