maths classes
2D Shapes2cosacosb Formula30-60-90 Formulas3D ShapesAbsolute Value FormulaAcute AngleAcute Angle triangleAdditionAlgebra FormulasAlgebra of MatricesAlgebraic EquationsAlgebraic ExpressionsAngle FormulaAnnulusAnova FormulaAnti-derivative FormulaAntiderivative FormulaApplication of DerivativesApplications of IntegrationArc Length FormulaArccot FormulaArctan FormulaArea Formula for QuadrilateralsArea FormulasArea Of A Sector Of A Circle FormulaArea Of An Octagon FormulaArea Of Isosceles TriangleArea Of ShapesArea Under the Curve FormulaArea of RectangleArea of Regular Polygon FormulaArea of TriangleArea of a Circle FormulaArea of a Pentagon FormulaArea of a Square FormulaArea of a Trapezoid FormulaArithmetic Mean FormulaArithmetic ProgressionsArithmetic Sequence Recursive FormulaArithmetic and Geometric ProgressionAscending OrderAssociative Property FormulaAsymptote FormulaAverage Deviation FormulaAverage Rate of Change FormulaAveragesAxioms Of ProbabilityAxis of Symmetry FormulaBasic Math FormulasBasics Of AlgebraBinary FormulaBinomial Probability FormulaBinomial distributionBodmas RuleBoolean AlgebraBusiness MathematicsCalculusCelsius FormulaCentral Angle of a Circle FormulaCentral Limit Theorem FormulaCentroid of a Trapezoid FormulaChain RuleChain Rule FormulaChange of Base FormulaChi Square FormulaCirclesCircumference FormulaCoefficient of Determination FormulaCoefficient of Variation FormulaCofactor FormulaComplex numbersCompound Interest FormulaConditional Probability FormulaConeConfidence Interval FormulaCongruence of TrianglesCorrelation Coefficient FormulaCos Double Angle FormulaCos Square theta FormulaCos Theta FormulaCosec Cot FormulaCosecant FormulaCosine FormulaCovariance FormulaCubeCylinderDiscover the world of MathsEllipseEquilateral triangleEuler’s formulaEven numbersExponentsFractionHeptagonHyperbolaIntegersIntegrationIntegration by partsLinesLocusMatricesNatural numbersNumber lineParallelogramPercentage formulaPerimeterPolygonPolynomialsPrismProbabilityPyramidPythagoras theoremScalene triangleSetsSlope formulaSolid shapesSphereSquareStandard deviation formulaSubtractionSymmetryTimeTrianglesTrigonometry formulaTypes of anglesValue of PiVectorVolume formulasVolume of a coneVolume of sphere formulaWhole numbers

Hyperbola

Edulyte Maths Lessons

Learn Maths anytime, anywhere

Sign Up

Mastering Hyperbolas: Equations, Formulas, and Functions

Comprehensive Definition, Description, Examples & Rules 

Edulyte Maths Lessons

Learn Maths anytime, anywhere

Sign Up
What will you learn

Hyperbolas are one of the most fascinating and protean angles in mathematics. They have numerous operations in wisdom, engineering, and art.

A hyperbola is a type of conic section, which is a wind formed by the crossroad of a cone and an airplane. A hyperbola consists of two symmetrical branches that approach two straight lines called asymptotes as they extend infinitely. A hyperbola has two foci, which are fixed points that determine the shape of the wind. The distance between any point on the hyperbola and the foci is always constant.

The Hyperbola Equation

To understand the hyperbola equation, we first need to define some terms:

  • The midpoint of the line segment connecting the foci is the center of a hyperbola.
  • The places on a hyperbola where the wind intersects is the transverse axis—the line that runs between the center and the foci—are known as the vertices.
  • The locales on a hyperbola where the wind crosses the conjugate axis, the line that runs vertically through the center of the hyperbola, are known as the co-vertices.
  • The transverse axis, generally pertaining to the major axis, has a length of 2a.
  • The conjugate axis, generally known as the minor axis, has a length of 2b.
  • The distance c, which stands for the distance from a center to a focus, satisfies the formula c2 = a2 b2.

The hyperbola equation can be written in different forms depending on its exposure and position. The most common forms are – 

  • The standard form of the hyperbola equation for a horizontally- acquainted hyperbola is:

a2( x − h) 2 − b2( y − k) 2 = 1

where( h, k) is the center of the hyperbola.

  • The standard form of the hyperbola equation for a vertically- -acquainted hyperbola is:

a2( y − k) 2 − b2( x − h) 2 = 1

where( h, k) is the center of the hyperbola.

  • The general form of the hyperbola equation for any hyperbola is

Ax2 Bxy Cy2 Dx Ey F = 0

where A, B, C, D, E, and F are constants, and B2- 4AC< 0.

Hyperbola Formula Basics

There are some crucial formulas related to hyperbolas that you should know. These formulas can help you find colorful information about a hyperbola given its equation or graph. There are some of them below:

  • The standard form of the hyperbola equation can be deduced from the general form by completing the square and dividing by a constant.
  • The foci of a hyperbola can be set up by using the formula: c2 = a2 b2

and adding or abating c from the equals of the center along the transverse axis.

  • The asymptotes of a hyperbola are the lines that the wind approaches as it extends infinitely. They can be set up by using the formula: y − k = ± ab( x − h)

where( h, k) is the center of the hyperbola, and a and b are related to the lengths of the transverse and conjugate axes.

  • The curiosity of a hyperbola is a measure of how important it deviates from being indirect. It can be set up by using the formula: e = ac
  • where c and a are related to the distances from the center to a focus and a vertex, independently. The curiosity of a hyperbola is always less than 1.

Functions and properties of Hyperbolas

Hyperbolas have numerous functions and properties that make them useful and intriguing in mathematics and wisdom. Some of them are:

  • Hyperbolas can model colorful marvels that involve inverse connections, similar to the stir of globes, satellites, and comets, the reflection and refraction of light, and the hyperbola function in math.
  • Hyperbolas can be used to construct geometric shapes, similar to triangles, blocks, and hexagons, by using their vertices,co-vertices, foci, and asymptotes as points or lines.
  • Hyperbolas have a duality property, which means that switching the places of x and y in the equation of hyperbola produces another hyperbola that’s the conjugate of the original bone. The conjugate hyperbola has the same center and asymptotes as the original one, but its transverse and conjugate axes are reciprocated.

Working with Hyperbolic Curves

One of the best ways to understand hyperbolas is to work with their graphical representation. By conniving and interpreting hyperbolic angles, you can gain sapience into their characteristics. There are some ways to follow when working with hyperbolic angles:

  • Identify the exposure and position of the hyperbola by looking at its equation or graph. Determine whether it’s vertical or perpendicular and whether it’s centered at the origin or shifted.
  • Find the center, vertices,co-vertices, foci, and asymptotes of the hyperbola by using the formulas bandied over. Mark these points and lines on a matching airplane.
  • Draw a cube with sides resembling the axes that pass through the vertices and co-vertices of the hyperbola. This cube will help you sketch the wind more directly.
  • Draw the hyperbolic branches by starting from the vertices and following the asymptotes as attendants. The wind should be smooth and symmetrical about both axes.

Equation of a Hyperbola in Detail

One of the most crucial resources for analyzing and resolving hyperbola-related problems is the equation of hyperbola. You can obtain a variety of details regarding a hyperbola’s form, size, location, and orientation by manipulating and utilizing its equation. The equation of a hyperbola can also be used in practical contexts involving hyperbolic functions or inverse connections.

Step-by-Step hyperbola equations

Example: Finding Information from the Equation

Given the equation of a hyperbola:

9(x−2)2​−16(y+1)2​=1

Find its center, vertices, co-vertices, foci, asymptotes, eccentricity, and orientation.

Solution:

To find the information from the equation of a hyperbola, we need to identify its factors and use the formulas bandied over.

In the usual form of the equation,( h, k) represents the center of the hyperbola. This case,

h = 2 k = – 1

The center is thus( 2,-1).

By adding or removing a from the center’s x-match along the transverse axis, one can find the hyperbola’s vertices. In this case,

a = 9 = 3.

Therefore,( 2 3,-1) and( 2- 3,-1), or( 5,-1) and(- 1,-1) are the vertices.

The hyperbola vertices can be obtained by either adding or abating b from the center’s y position along the conjugate axis. This case,

b = 16 = 4.

Therefore,( 2,-1 4) and( 2,-1- 4), or( 2, 3) and( 2,-5), are the co-vertices.

The following formula can be used to find the hyperbola’s foci

c2 = a2 b2

and changing the center’s equals along the transverse axis by adding or abating c. Then, c2 = 9 16 = 25 and c = 25 = 5.

Therefore,( 2 5,-1) and( 2- 5,-1), or( 7,-1) and(- 3,-1) are the foci.

Using the following formula, the hyperbola’s asymptotes are attained

y- disadvantage k = ± ab(x-minus h) is the formula in which( h, k) is the hyperbola’s center and a and b are the transverse and conjugate axes’ lengths. Then, y −( −1) = ± 34( x −2), and y 1 = ± 34 x −38. Therefore, y 1 = (4/3) x-(8/3) and y 1 = -(4/3) x(8/3) are the asymptotes.

The eccentricity of the hyperbola can be calculated using the following formula:

e=ac,

where a and c stand for the distances between the center, a focus, and a vertex, respectively.

Where the distances between the center, a focus, and a vertex, respectively, are represented by the variables c and a. This instance of e=35. Thus, 5/3 is the eccentricity. The sign of the terms in the equation’s standard form determines the hyperbola’s direction. The hyperbola is horizontal if the term with x is positive and the term with y is negative. The hyperbola is vertical if the word with x is negative and the term with y is positive. In this instance, the hyperbola is horizontal because the word with x is positive and the term with y is negative.

Step Up Your Math Game Today!

Free sign-up for a personalised dashboard, learning tools, and unlimited possibilities!

learn maths with edulyte

Key Takeaways

  1. A hyperbola is a particular kind of conic section made up of two symmetrical branches that, when they grow infinitely, approach two straight lines known as asymptotes.

  2. There are two foci on a hyperbola, which are fixed points that define the curve’s shape. Any point on the hyperbola and the foci are always the same distance apart.

  3. Depending on where it is and how it is oriented, there are various ways to write the hyperbola equation. The standard form and the generic form are the two most used formats.

  4. You can get a variety of information on hyperbolas using certain important formulas, including those that pertain to their center, vertices, co-vertices, foci, asymptotes, eccentricity, and focal parameters.

Quiz

Check your score in the end

Quiz

Check your score in the end
Question of

Question comes here

Frequently Asked Questions

The following are a few popular hyperbola formulas and their uses:

  • The difference between a point’s distance from its foci is always constant for any point P on a hyperbola, according to the distance formula for hyperbolas. This formula can be used to determine whether a given point is on a hyperbola or to find unknown points or lengths on a hyperbola.
  • The length of a line member vertically to the transverse axis that crosses both branches of the hyperbola and passes through a focus is known as the focal parameter, or latus rectum, of a hyperbola.
  • The functions that are related to the hyperbola and its characteristics are known as hyperbolic functions or hyperbolic trigonometric functions. These comprise the following functions csch, sech, coth, tanh, sinh, and cosh. 
  • The inverse functions of the hyperbolic functions are known as the area hyperbolic functions or the inverse hyperbolic functions. Arsinh, Arcosh, Artanh, arcsch, Arsech, and Arcoth are some of these functions. 

To graph a hyperbola and determine its orientation, you can follow these steps:

  • Using the formulas covered above, determine the hyperbola’s center, vertices, co-vertices, foci, and asymptotes. These lines and points should be marked on a coordinate plane.
  • Create a rectangle whose sides are parallel to the axes and which goes across the hyperbola’s co-vertices and vertices. With the aid of this rectangle, you may draw the curve more precisely.
  • Using the asymptotes as a reference, begin at the vertices and draw the hyperbolic branches. About both axes, the curve ought to be symmetrical and smooth.
  • Examine the hyperbola’s equation or graph to ascertain its direction. The hyperbola is vertical if the term with x is positive and the term with y is negative. However, also the hyperbola is perpendicular If the term with y is positive and the term with x is negative.

The equation of a hyperbola in general form is:

Ax2 Bxy Cy2 Dx Ey F = 0

where A, B, C, D, E, and F are constants, and B2- 4AC< 0.

You might look into any of the following materials or courses to learn more about hyperbolas and their uses:

  • Khan Academy: Hyperbolas provides video lectures, worksheets, and tests on a range of hyperbola-related subjects.
  • An interactive tutorial on graphing and analyzing hyperbolas can be found in Math Is Fun: Hyperbola.
  • Edulyte: Conic Sections is an online course that provides thorough explanations and examples for all forms of conic sections, including hyperbolas.
  • An overview of the characteristics, uses, and history of hyperbolas may be found in the encyclopedia entry MathWorld: Hyperbola.
Like
Share it with your friends

Learn Maths

2D Shapes2cosacosb Formula30-60-90 Formulas3D ShapesAbsolute Value FormulaAcute AngleAcute Angle triangleAdditionAlgebra FormulasAlgebra of MatricesAlgebraic EquationsAlgebraic ExpressionsAngle FormulaAnnulusAnova FormulaAnti-derivative FormulaAntiderivative FormulaApplication of DerivativesApplications of IntegrationArc Length FormulaArccot FormulaArctan FormulaArea Formula for QuadrilateralsArea FormulasArea Of A Sector Of A Circle FormulaArea Of An Octagon FormulaArea Of Isosceles TriangleArea Of ShapesArea Under the Curve FormulaArea of RectangleArea of Regular Polygon FormulaArea of TriangleArea of a Circle FormulaArea of a Pentagon FormulaArea of a Square FormulaArea of a Trapezoid FormulaArithmetic Mean FormulaArithmetic ProgressionsArithmetic Sequence Recursive FormulaArithmetic and Geometric ProgressionAscending OrderAssociative Property FormulaAsymptote FormulaAverage Deviation FormulaAverage Rate of Change FormulaAveragesAxioms Of ProbabilityAxis of Symmetry FormulaBasic Math FormulasBasics Of AlgebraBinary FormulaBinomial Probability FormulaBinomial distributionBodmas RuleBoolean AlgebraBusiness MathematicsCalculusCelsius FormulaCentral Angle of a Circle FormulaCentral Limit Theorem FormulaCentroid of a Trapezoid FormulaChain RuleChain Rule FormulaChange of Base FormulaChi Square FormulaCirclesCircumference FormulaCoefficient of Determination FormulaCoefficient of Variation FormulaCofactor FormulaComplex numbersCompound Interest FormulaConditional Probability FormulaConeConfidence Interval FormulaCongruence of TrianglesCorrelation Coefficient FormulaCos Double Angle FormulaCos Square theta FormulaCos Theta FormulaCosec Cot FormulaCosecant FormulaCosine FormulaCovariance FormulaCubeCylinderDiscover the world of MathsEllipseEquilateral triangleEuler’s formulaEven numbersExponentsFractionHeptagonHyperbolaIntegersIntegrationIntegration by partsLinesLocusMatricesNatural numbersNumber lineParallelogramPercentage formulaPerimeterPolygonPolynomialsPrismProbabilityPyramidPythagoras theoremScalene triangleSetsSlope formulaSolid shapesSphereSquareStandard deviation formulaSubtractionSymmetryTimeTrianglesTrigonometry formulaTypes of anglesValue of PiVectorVolume formulasVolume of a coneVolume of sphere formulaWhole numbers
Newsletters

Sign up for Learner Newsletter

Subscribe now for discounts, learning resources, blogs and guides. We do not spam.

We won’t pass your details on to anyone else. By clicking the subscribe button you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Newsletters

Sign up for Tutor Newsletter

Subscribe now for discounts, learning resources, blogs and guides. We do not spam.

We won’t pass your details on to anyone else. By clicking the subscribe button you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

PTE Tutorials: Customised Packages for Every Learner

Standard

$75 AUD

One time

popular

Premium

$275 AUD

One time

Elite

$575 AUD

One time