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Indicative Mood

Phonetics:

ɪnˈdɪkətɪv

muːd

Pronunciation:

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Mastering Certainty: The Indicative Mood Explored

Comprehensive Definition, Description, Examples & Rules 

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Definition of the Indicative Mood

When a verb is in the indicative mood, it either confirms or refutes a fact. A communicator or writer uses the indicative mood, the verbal aspect in grammar, to express content that appears realistic.

Indicative mood example: 

  • Ram performs every Sunday

(The indicative mood is present in this verb. It is a declaration.)

  • Is Ram the main singer?

(The indicative mood is present in this verb. It is an interrogation.)

The use of an indicative mood verb in a phrase is dependent on whether the sentence contains declarations of fact since the indicative mood is the only “realis mood,” which communicates something real or true. Both declarative and interrogative sentence patterns allow the use of indicative verbs in any verb tense. The most typical mood category in English is indicative mood.

Characteristics of the Indicative Mood

In the broadest sense, the part of our verbs falls into this group since they represent facts, views, statements, and inquiries.

  • This is the broadest and most often used category, which includes a variety of sentences.

  • In comparison to the imperative and subjunctive moods, it is also the grammatical mood structure that is utilised the most frequently.

  • It is known as the “realis mood” in English grammar.

  • Declarative and interrogative sentences are both included within the group of indicative moods.

The indicative mood is used to convey one of the following:

  • Assertion – The Taj Mahal is the busiest tourist attraction in India.
  • Denial – I cannot speak English.
  • Questions – Are you able to communicate in English?

This mood can be used in declarative sentences like a statement, interrogative sentences like inquiry, or negative sentences like denial. It can also be used in the past, present, or future tense.

Indicative mood examples: 

  • He achieved success on the entrance exam last year (declarative in the past indicative).
  • He’s sitting for the entrance exam this year (declarative in the present indicative).
  • Will you be taking this year’s entrance exam? (Future indicative interrogative sentence)

The indicative mood:

This presents information or poses queries. For instance:

  • Manoj is driving the vehicle.
  • Does it have a wheel?

The imperative mood:

This conveys a request or a demand. For instance: 

  • Operate the vehicle!
  • Drive the automobile, please.

The subjunctive mood:

This conveys hope or uncertainty. For instance:

  • I advise Das to operate the vehicle.
  • I propose that Das be asked to drive the vehicle.

Examples of the Indicative Mood

Indicative mood examples of Facts

  • During the month of April, there is a lot of rain.
  • It rained a lot yesterday.
  • There is rain.
  • There isn’t any rain.
  • Does it rain?

Indicative mood examples of Opinions

  • Tomorrow there will be a lot of rain.
  • That painting is really lovely.
  • It tastes great to eat these chocolate cookies.
  • We think he ought to travel by himself.
  • My younger sister enjoys the annual summer trip to Florida.

Types of the indicative mood

Present Indicative Mood

This is the combination of present tense and indicative mood, which is the combination of present tense imperative mood and subjunctive mood, built from the present subjunctive. When you use the present indicative in English, you’re telling the person you’re speaking to what’s going on at present.

  • Eg: She runs, she is running (What occurs and what is happening in the present)

Past Indicative Mood

The past indicative uses verbs to talk about events that have occurred or are thought to have occurred in the past.

  • Eg: She ran, she was running

Future Indicative Mood

The future indicative refers to events that will occur or are anticipated to occur. Unlike the present and past tenses, the future tense in English is not a distinct verb inflection; rather, it is approximated by the expression will or be going to + the primary verb.

  • Eg: she will run, she will be running

Progressive/Continuous Indicative Mood

A continuing or unfinished action is described by the progressive (continuous) aspect. The habitual element discusses behaviours that are repeated frequently. These two both fall under the category of imperfection.

  • Eg: she is going to the store in about 5 minutes.

Perfect Indicative Mood

They moved in the present perfect tense. An indicative mood verb in the present perfect tense indicates that the action started in the past. The structure will be: Subject + has/have + verb (v3)

  • Eg: she has gone

Perfect Continuous Indicative Mood

The verbal mood known as the present perfect continuous, sometimes known as the present perfect progressive, serves to talk about past activities that are still in existence.

  • Eg: For the past month, I have been reading War and Peace.

The present perfect continuous is used in this sentence to show that reading War and Peace is an activity that started in the past but is not yet complete in the present.

Formation of the Indicative Mood

Present Simple

Subject + regular verb (v1) + -s/-es Irregular verbs that aren’t regular, like “to be” and “to know,” have their own patterns.

  • Eg: she likes to be an angel

Past simple

Subject + verb (v2) infinitive +-ed as a conclusion verbs that aren’t regular, like “to think” and “to come,” have their own patterns.

Eg: she born to

Future Simple

Subject + will/shall + verb (v1)

  • Eg: she will run

Present Continuous

Subject + is/am/are + Verb(+ing)

  • Eg: she is going

Past Continuous

Subject + was/were + Verb(+ing)

  • Eg: she was going

Future Continuous

Subject + will be/shall be + verb(+ing)

  • Eg: she will be going

Present Perfect

Subject + has/have + verb (v3)

  • Eg: she has come to the office

Past Perfect

Subject + had + verb (v3)

  • Eg: she has come

Future Perfect

Subject + will have + verb (v3)

  • Eg: she will have come

Present Perfect Continuous

Subject + has/have + been + verb(+ing)

  • Eg: she has been working

Past Perfect Continuous

Subject + had + been + verb(+ing)

  • Eg: she had been working

Future Perfect Continuous

Subject + will have been + verb(+ing)

  • Eg: she will have been working

Common Verbs Used in the Indicative Mood

Here are a few more verbs in the indicative mood:

  • The sky is clear.
  • She stopped working
  • The movie was quite good.
  • Peter can’t wait to see you.
  • Alana is unfamiliar with him.
  • The poster is being created by Lisa.
  • The air we breathe will be inaccessible to the aliens.
  • Is that so?
  • It was delicious. How did it go?

Indicative Mood in Different Tenses

The suggestive mood can be expressed using the past, present, and future tenses, as well as the simple, continuous, and perfect aspects.

  • Simple past: Levee and Indhu danced.
  • Simple present tense: Levee and Indhu dance.
  • Simple future tense: Levee and Indhu will dance.
  • Past perfect tense: Levee and Indhu had danced.
  • Present perfect tense: Levee and Indhu have danced.
  • Future perfect tense: Levee and Indhu will have danced.
  • Present continuous: Levee and Indhu are dancing.
  • Past continuous: Levee and Indhu were dancing.
  • Future continuous: Levee and Indhu will be dancing.
list of adverbs for kids

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Key Takeaways

  1. When a verb is in the indicative mood, it either confirms or refutes a fact.

  2. The typical style we employ for factual claims is the indicative mood.

  3. The use of an indicative mood verb in a phrase is dependent on whether the sentence contains declarations of fact.

  4. When you use the present indicative in English, you’re telling the person you’re speaking to what’s going on at present.

  5. The past indicative uses verbs to talk about events that have occurred or are thought to have occurred in the past.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Are there specific rules or guidelines for using the indicative mood?

The typical style we employ for factual claims is the indicative mood. Regular grammatical rules apply to the indicative verb form: singular noun, singular verb; plural noun, plural verb.

How can I identify the indicative mood in a sentence?

The indicative mood presents facts as statements, judgements, or queries. As an illustration, “You kicked the ball.” The verb is in the indicative mood if they are merely conveying a fact or opinion or posing a query. 

Are there any exceptions or irregularities in the indicative mood?

Yes, there are changes and irregularities like change in spelling and irregular verb form.

What are the main characteristics of the indicative mood?

  • In the broadest sense, the bulk of our verbs fall into this group since they represent facts, views, statements, and inquiries.
  • Factual statements and queries are grammatical constructions that fall within the indicative mood group.  
  • Any verb can be written in the indicative mood, regardless of its tense or aspect.

How does the indicative mood help convey facts and certainty in language?

A factual assertion is expressed using this attitude. An action is expressed as a factual declaration when a verb is in the indicative tense.

Eg: I took part in the musical play.

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